Guest Blog: Combatting Scar Tissue w/ Lindsay Burns

I met Lindsay Burns in a Muscle Activation Technique seminar last year. We were table mates and it was there that I first heard of Endermologie. Her excitement and knowledge on the modality was evident immediately and I have since referred some patients to her. Endermologie, in the context she uses it, helps remove scar tissue which can be a big barrier for a lot of people in adapting and finding balance and ease. She approaches her clients with holistic goggles, recognizing the role of scar tissue as a stabilizer, and that once that is removed, a person must also have means to continue that stability through strengthening and muscle activation. 

I figured if I had never heard of this technique, many others probably were also in the dark, so I asked Lindsay to share more about what she does... For further information, to meet Lindsay or to schedule a consultation with her, her contact is at the end of the article. Of course you can also contact me directly and I'll be happy to connect you. 

What is Endermologie? This is a question I get asked all the time and honestly I feel like it’s the best - kept secret around.

An Endermologie machine is 100% natural and non invasive. It breaks down scar tissue, increases blood circulation and boosts the Lymphatic System. And that just scratches the surface of what it can do.

Does this sound too good to be true? You aren’t alone in thinking that. Wonder why you’ve never heard of this before? You aren’t alone in that either. The European designed machine has moved away from it’s original use in North America and is being used mostly for cosmetic purposes but luckily, I spent time in the US observing, learning and training on how the machine can be used for more restorative, recovery and mobility purposes.       

I see the results and changes on a daily basis. I often hear, “I’ve been like this for twenty plus years. I’ve tried everything and it just stays the same”. I completely understand the helplessness that an injury past or present can make you feel. I’ve been there myself. Recently, one of my new and very active clients came in unable to completely extend her leg. After multiple knee surgeries and a lot of scar tissue built up she often experienced residual pain and constant aching. After trying a variety of things with little to no improvement my client was referred to me. Not knowing what to expect she booked her first appointment and was surprised when she could feel a difference almost immediately. After a handful of treatments this client has a greater range of motion. The dull aching is less, if at all, and her knee feels better then it has in years.

Knees, hips, tennis elbow, shin splints, neck, shoulder and back pain can all be treated with Endermologie plus much, much more. Recovery after surgery can also be expedited once you have the okay from your Physician to aid in regaining mobility.  

Endermologie works great on its own while complimenting other modalities as well. I like to think of it as a tool used to clear a roadblock. It increases blood circulation by 400%, which promotes healing and is able to get deeper then deep tissue massage.

The founding principles of Endermologie were to break down scar tissue, reduce inflammation and increase mobility. The bottom line is, it works. My clients are pleased with their results and how quickly they’re able to resume their everyday and active lifestyles.

I would love for you to come and check it out!

Lindsay Burns practices out of Lasya Healing Alternative Wellness Centre in Calgary, Alberta. For further info check out her website at www.endotechnique.com or find her on instagram @endotechnique!

Guest Blog: Making a Sustainable Nutrition Plan w/ Max Caron

As a former athlete and strength and conditioning coach, I understand that many of us have a Love/Hate relationship with food. When most people think about their diet in relation to their training, the mind goes to 1 of 2 places; what we feel we have to eat to stay healthy and in shape…. and the delicious assortment of goodies that we will eat when we get there!

The reality is that having a plan in place for our diet is just as important as having a plan in place for what we do in the gym. Rather than close our eyes, crossing our fingers and hoping for the best, our time and effort is best served when we put a system in place that supports our lifestyle and fitness goals.

My #1 focus when building a nutritional plan to support my training goals is to make sure the plan is sustainable. When I have a training AND nutrition plan that support each other and function harmoniously with my life, then I can maintain the progress I make when life gets hectic. When I think of sustainable meal choices, I think of 4 elements; delicious, homemade, healthy and simple.

While making a nutritional plan healthy is self-explanatory, an emphasis on taste and flavour is sometimes neglected. When we enjoy what we eat, our motivation and commitment to the plan will stay high. Simply put, it is always harder to stay on the plan when our taste buds aren’t stimulated. 

Homemade choices are another important element because finding healthy choices outside of your own home is hard and often times the choices aren’t as healthy as they seem. It is very tough to get consistent results when we don’t know exactly what is going into our bodies. Furthermore, the healthy choices offered often come at a steep price, which gives us even more reason to save some money and learn to make home cooked meals.

So we need a home cooked meal that is healthy and delicious; the final piece to this is our meals must be simple to be sustainable. For many, the demands from work and our personal lives leaves little time to prepare meals. The best choices are meals that we can prepare in 30-45 mins max. We must anticipate that we won’t always have time to throw together the perfect meal. Meal prep strategies such as making extras, pre-cutting vegetables or making and bottling homemade dressings and marinades are great ways to help shave off some cook time.

I also recommend “mastering” the prep time for 1-3 meals that you love to eat; so when your crunched for time you will know exactly how long it takes to churn out your favourite choice. This can be tough if we try and learn 7 recipes all at once, so stick to just a few favourites. Remember, the whole strategy is to eat homemade, healthy, delicious and simple meals on a consistent basis. This is the key to a sustainable meal plan which will help deliver sustainable results. Happy Cooking!

 

 Max Caron is a strength and conditioning coach at OPEX Calgary Central.

As a previous CFL player for the Calgary Stampeders, Max was a 16th overall draft pick in the 2014 CFL Draft as well as a 1st Team All-Canadian and CIS Football Major Award Winner.

His playing career was cut short due to injury, but his proudest moment was returning to play after suffering 2 ruptured achilles tendons in back-to-back seasons.

With his professional athletic career behind him, he now gets to help others be their best selves and reach their health and fitness goals.

When not coaching, Max enjoys playing sports, training, cooking and spending time with his wife and their two kitties. 

IG:            @max.caron43
Twitter:    @MaxCaron43

How to Protect Your Body While Cycling

Originally written and posted by the Alberta College and Association of Chiropractors

Cycling in Alberta has seen a spike in popularity, trading in the car for a bicycle has become more commonplace than ever. Some cyclists strap on their helmets and ride for exercise or enjoyment while others view cycling as a way to protect the environment from unnecessary emissions.

Although cycling has many benefits, cyclists can be at risk of injury from their sport. The repetitive nature of riding a bike can cause problems with both muscles and joints due to overtraining, poor form, poorly fit bike, or many other factors.

Common biking Injuries and how to prevent them

Lower back pain

Lower Back pain (LBP) can cause problem for cyclists for a number of reasons. The easiest explanation is the prolonged bending of the backIt doesn’t take a Musculoskeletal (MSK) expert to see that cyclists spend long periods of time in a fixed position.  A poorly fit bike or bad body position on the bike can lead to lower back pain due to abnormal wear to the joints along your spine as well a number of muscular imbalances.

How to prevent LBP – There are a few tools you can use to help fight lower back pain while you hit the road on your bike.

Form - As with anything to do with the spine, posture is important.  While riding, keep a neutral spine by bending at the hips and avoid hunching your mid-back.  Your spine naturally has a curve to it, this should be maintained while riding but not overemphasized or flattened. It is often difficult to evaluate your own posture so it is worth having someone look at your body position on your bike or use a trainer in front of a mirror.

Equipment - A poorly fit bike may also be the cause of your LBP, being either too stretched out or compacted by your bike can result in abnormal stresses to your back.  Most local bike shops have trained staff that can assist you with ensuring your bike is the correct size for you as well as any minor adjustments required to fit the bike to your body.

Knee pain

Pain in your knees can be caused by several factors, most commonly it is due to poorly adjusted cleats or pedals forcing your feet out of alignment with your knees however improper seat height, prior knee injuries, poor cycling form, muscle imbalance or overtraining can cause knee pain.

How to prevent knee pain – There are a few things to look for when trying to determine the cause of your knee pain. 

Pedals/Cleats - How your feet sit on the pedalscould be the key to preventing your knee pain, especially if you are using clipless pedals that lock your feet in place. Your knee should be pointing straight ahead and your feet should be parallel to the ground while you are pedaling. Riders often have a tendency to tilt their knees out.

Seat Height – A seat height that is either too high or too low will cause stress on the knees.  Too high and you will be hyperextending the knee on every pedal stroke and too low causes a loss in power and excessive load to the knees.  Ideally, your knee should be slightly bent (not locked) at the bottom of your pedal stroke with your feet parallel to the ground.

Prior Injury

If you have had a prior injury to your knee, hip or ankles your seat height, pedal positioning and other bio-mechanics will need to adapt. If you have been cleared by a health care professional (such as your chiropractor)l to ride it is a good idea to get an assessment from a qualified bike fitter to ensure you are not causing re-injury.

Muscle Imbalance or overtraining

Muscle imbalance is quite common in cyclists since certain muscles will be strengthened by the exercise while other supporting musculature may not. It is a good idea to find an exercise to strengthen the stabilizing muscles in your leg to maintain balance.  For beginner riders it is important to start out slow and not seek massive gains in distance, speed, time or effort too quickly. Your body will need time to adjust to a change in activity.

Shoulder Pain

Pain in your shoulders while riding can be caused by carrying stress in your shoulders while riding, poor body position on the bike or a poorly fit bike.

Wrist Pain

The most common cause of wrist pain is a very aggressive cycling position that causes you to put a lot weight on your handlebars. Try to move your hand position around on your handlebars as much as possible to avoid the same position for extended periods of time.

Visit your Chiropractor

If you’re thinking about taking up cycling talk to your chiropractor before you strap on the helmet and hit the road. Together you will be able to identify potential injury concerns and ensure you get off to an injury free start.  If you are experiencing pain, numbness or tingling or other MSK problems while riding your chiropractor will also be able to provide treatment and advice to treat these problems.